Health | Lifestyle

Wine, Women, and Woe: Is Wine Drinking Becoming A Dangerous Social Trend?

By on March 3, 2017

There appears to be a growing trend in the number of women who love wine. In “Real Housewives” several members have parlayed their own screen imbibing into marketing their own wine brands. There are numerous Facebook groups for women who like wine.

Although this may not seem like anything unusual, women have not always had such a keen appreciation for the delicacy and flavor of wine. Clever wine marketing is actually behind the popularity of wine drinking among women.

This is how the trend started and gained momentum over the decades:

After the prohibition, most of the Californian wineries had perished. In an attempt to recover, the wine industry decided to promote to women because postwar housewives were frustrated by the fact that wine was considered a symbol of male power. In classy restaurants, for example, where wine was most often consumed, when waiters approached a couple, they addressed the man, and it was the man who viewed the wine list and took the first taste after the bottle was uncorked.

One successful promotion was introducing wine in supermarkets. Middle-aged housewives were hired as wine samplers. When younger women shopped, they were offered them a sip of wine. After the sampling, they were trained on how to educate the younger women on what wine went best with the dinner they were preparing that evening.

Another successful promotion was wine tips in women’s magazines. These articles taught women how to order wine in restaurants and how to serve it at home. It also promoted wine as a way to relax and unwind after a stressful day.

Over time, public perception about wine changed. Women began to associate it with equality, entry into college, economic status, and stress relief. It became seen as a symbol for women who were entering male-dominated colleges and working in male-dominated professions like technology and finance.

However, wives and mothers also began to associate wine as a positive thing. They saw it as an antidote to their boring lives. Although not vying for status or recognition with men, imbibing wine offered relief from the dreariness of staying at home and looking after children.

Is this a sign of growing alcoholism among American women? Not necessarily. According to an article in the Greenhouse Addiction Programs blog, entitled “Binge Drinking: Do You Have an Alcohol Use Disorder?” there is a defining difference between “low risk drinking” and “binge drinking.” This site refers to the definition offered by the National Institution on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAA): “Moderate drinking is defined as having up to one alcoholic beverage each day for women and up to two drinks per day for men.”

Statistics on Women Who Imbibe

While social drinking is innocent enough if it is done in moderation, things become a little more alarming nationwide when you look at the statistics.

According to Gabrielle Glasse, who wrote an article in the the Wall Street Journal, entitled “Why She Drinks:”

  • Women are the primary drinkers of the 800 million gallons of wine sold annually in the US.
  • Between 1998 and 2007, the arrest rate for drunk drivers rose 30% for women while it dropped to 7% for men.
  • Between 1999 and 2008, the Emergency Hospital admission rate for dangerously intoxicated people rose 52% for women while it only rose to 9% for men.

She also discussed how Gallup Poll studies showed the following trends:

  • Well-educated, affluent women were more likely to drink.
  • White women drank more than black women and Hispanic women.
  • The percentage of women who had come to imbibe rose over the years. For instance, in 1992, 37% of White women out of a sample group of 85,000 American drank. Then in 2002, the percentage had risen 10%. (The percentage of all racial groups increased over time.)

Women’s Tolerance for Alcohol 

Although the rate of alcohol consumption can be correlated with the rising social and economic equality of women, the effect of alcohol on women is not the same as that for men.

Women who drink the same amount of alcohol than men experience a stronger effect. This is because they have more fat and less water. The fat makes them absorb more alcohol while there is less water to dilute it.

What’s more, men have more of an enzyme which breaks alcohol down before it slips into the bloodstream.

Since women experience the toxicity of alcohol more than men, they are also more quickly impaired by it. This means that liver and brain damage is more acute in women than men.

When Is Wine Drinking Problematic?

According to the NIAA, addiction problems arise when low-risk drinking becomes excessive drinking. They define low-risk drinking “as no more than three drinks in a day for women or four drinks per day for men.” And they define excessive drinking as anything “more than the recommended daily drinking levels – or more than seven drinks in a week total for women or 14 drinks for men – is termed “excessive drinking” and may increase the drinker’s risk for developing chronic health problems caused or worsened by alcohol or experiencing an accident under the influence.”

 

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Health

Signs Your Best Friend Could Be Dealing with Addiction

By on January 16, 2017

Your best friend since high school has started acting strange and you can’t really put your finger on it. One thing you do notice is the fact that she’s been drinking a lot more than usual when you’re around her. You want to help, but you want to be sure that there is a problem before you approach her. Determining whether someone you care for has a problem with alcohol is easier said than done.

Despite what you might know about the stereotypical drunk who acts belligerent and can barely stand is not necessarily what you’re going to see when you’re around your friend. Likely if there is an issue she’s ashamed, embarrassed, and afraid to come forward and get help. This means they can be very good at hiding the signs from you. That’s why knowing what to pay attention to can help you recognize the signs of alcohol abuse or addiction in your friend and support her in getting the help that she needs.

Learn as Much as You Can

Before approaching your bestie about her potential issue, it can be beneficial to first learn a bit more about addiction and the treatment options. This way you can be a great source of support for her when she is ready to get help. Aside from talking with a doctor, one of your best sources of information about alcohol addiction in women and treatment options is specifically tailored rehab for women. A rehab facility will have trained abuse and addiction counselors as well as medical personnel on staff to answer your questions and give you reliable tips on how to help your friend.

Signs Your Friend is Hiding an Alcohol Problem

1.  Increased Quantity

One of the first signs that your best friend could be hiding an alcohol problem is her increased consumption. With alcohol dependency and addiction, the person’s body develops a high tolerance for the substance requiring a person to use more. Examples might include you noticed your friend refills her glass more than once at girl’s night or always seems to have a wine bottle ready to open.

2.  Missing In Action

Increased isolation is another sign that your friend could be dealing with an alcohol problem. If she’s missing events that she would normally make or seems to be turning down your offers to hang out, it is possible that she’s trying to hide her addiction from you. Loss of interest in activities and people is fairly common when suffering from addiction. There simply becomes a point where their addiction seems to consume their lives leaving little room for much else.

3.  Money Trouble

Someone who is suffering from addiction will often fall into financial troubles. The cost of affording alcohol on the consistent basis can be enough to cause necessary bills to fall behind. If your friend has been stressed about finances lately, or seems to be asking you for financial assistance, they could be trying to pay for their vice.

4.  Physical Changes

If a person has been suffering from addiction for a while, they could start to change physically. Though alcohol affects everyone differently, some changes you might notice include drastic changes in their weight, decreased overall health (getting sick more often), changes in the skin, and so on.

If you’ve noticed any of these signs when interacting with your best friend she could really need some help. When approaching her on the matter, be sure that you communicate with her in a loving and supportive way as addiction can be very difficult to admit and deal with. Once she is ready to receive help, pointing her in the direction of rehab facilities for treatment would be the best option. Though it may be hard to deal with, knowing that she has her bestie there every step of the way will make the treatment and recovery process a lot easier to get through.

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Beauty

Treating Unwanted Growths On Aging Skin

By on October 31, 2016

The older your skin, the more susceptible it is to unwanted skin conditions, including moles, liver spots, freckles, wrinkles, etc. The strength of skin cells to resist these conditions declines with age, and they give in because they are unable to renew themselves more often.

How the skin ages and the type of unwanted growth depends on several factors, such as the diet, lifestyle, and personal habits. For instance, females that have greater exposure to the sun are more apt to developing cancerous moles or spots. Smoking and consumption of processed food can lead to the creation of free radicals inside the body, which can damage cells and lead to premature wrinkles.

That said, the following are the most common types of skin growths:

·  Actinic & Seborrheic Keratoses

Actinic keratoses refer to brownish or red colored scaly spots that appear on the skin as it grows older. These spots can turn cancerous if they become acute and the victim of the growth fails to seek treatment at an early stage. Seborrheic keratosis are warts that can be black or brown in color, and are usually benign growths that look as if they’ve fastened themselves to the skin’s surface. The most common growth areas include the back of the hand, forearm, or face.

·  Moles

Nevi or moles are tiny skin marks that result due to the increase in pigment-producing cells in the skin. They can be rough, smooth, flat or raised, and accompanied by some hair. Most of them are brown or black in color, but a few can be yellowish or skin-colored. They respond to hormonal changes and change overtime; exposure to the sun after growth can darken their appearance. Another type of mole is the atypical mole, which is larger than the normal mole and can be tan or pink. Moles can appear anywhere on the skin.

·  Cherry angiomas

This is a skin growth that affects mostly middle-aged women. Chery angiomas is classified as a small, bright red, benign, elevated bump that is caused by dilated blood vessels. Fatty deposits may also contribute to their formation. They are quite small in size, the usual being pinhead size to on quarter inch. Most growths are smooth, but some can stick out from the skin. The fortunate aspect of this growth is that it is noncancerous, and doesn’t harm the health.

How to treat these skin growths

Several measures can treat or reduce the symptoms of unwanted skin growths. You should always start with natural and external treatment options. For instance, moles can be removed with surgery or through the duct tape method, but using mole removal products is recommended because they are made from high quality plant extracts allowing for homeopathic treatment without any side effects. It is possible to take care of benign moles right from the comfort of your home, which saves you expensive visits to the dermatologists.

Likewise, topical ointments can be used on actinic & seborrheic keratoses. Home remedies can also be applied to see results before the option for a dermatologist is considered. For example, Apple Cider Vinegar is recommended for removal of cherry angiomas, but the skin needs to be open. Cryotherapy or freezing can also treat many of these growths.

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